• 268
  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Cancer patient develops badge to use on tube

Shared by Rita Torrao on 2019-01-14 13:43

About the solution

It is well established that fighting cancer is an overwhelmed mission. Not only for the disease itself but also for all the consequences from the treatments.
During his battle with throat cancer, James underwent radiotherapy. To attend the treatments, James used to take the London Underground, and found it really difficult to find a seat as he was not visibly unwell and could not speak because of his treatment.

“I couldn’t talk as I had radiotherapy in my throat. There was no way I could make myself understood short of writing notes.”, James said. “I had to travel feeling like that and the heroic amounts of morphine I was prescribed made me appear drunk.”

Inspired by the Transport for London (TFL)’s Baby On Board badges, James created the Cancer on Board badge to encourage people to make room on public transport for those undergoing treatment. The aim is to help cancer patients’ journeys to and from treatment a little more bearable.

Adapted from: https://www.standard.co.uk/news/london/cancer-patient-creates-cancer-on-...

More info: http://canceronboard.org/

This solution shall not include mention to the use of drugs, chemicals or biologicals (including food); invasive devices; offensive, commercial or inherently dangerous content. This solution was not medically validated. Proceed with caution! If you have any doubts, please consult with a health professional.

About the author

James McNaught, from London, UK, was diagnosed with throat cancer in 2014. James had to use the London Underground to get to University College Hospital for the treatments. As he was not visibly unwell and could not speak because of his treatment, James struggled to find a seat. So, he came up with the idea of wearing "Cancer on board" badges when riding the network.

Tags associated to this solution

Like solution
Close en
Close