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Father invents new musical instrument for his son

Shared by Merle Schlottmann on 2017-04-24 11:57

About the solution

Family Veeh has always made a lot of music at home, either with violin, cello or harmonium. They quickly observed that their son Andreas, who was born with Down Syndrome, shared this passion for music. But due to his condition, it seemed impossible that Andreas would be able to make music on his own, at least with existing instruments. Hence, his father invented the Veeh-Harve, a stringed instrument suited to the Andreas’ abilities.

Inspired by old stringed instruments with templates for sheet music, Hermann invented a totally new instrument that can be played without knowledge of notes. He created an easy and clear notation especially suited to this instrument. The templates for the sheet music are positioned between the resonance body and the strings so that the notation is made tangible.

It took five years and numerous prototypes until Hermann launched the instrument in 1992. The Veeh-Harfe is made of valuable tone wood and the space between the strings is larger compared to other instruments.

“The Veeh-Harfe opens up a completely new world to Andreas and other people. The dream of making music with people with different skills and talents has become reality”, is stated on the official website.

The innovation enables children the first contact to music instruments, is used for music pedagogy as well as in clinics and enriches the everyday life in retirement homes.

Adapted from: http://www.veeh-harfe.de/

What about you? We are curious to read about your innovation on the website.
https://youtu.be/rRDDwKNpG4Q

This solution shall not include mention to the use of drugs, chemicals or biologicals (including food); invasive devices; offensive, commercial or inherently dangerous content. This solution was not medically validated. Proceed with caution! If you have any doubts, please consult with a health professional.

About the author

Hermann Veeh, from Germany, started to develop the Veeh-Harfe in 1987. His aim was to allow his son Andreas, who was born with trisomy 21, to play an instrument.

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