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Amputee creates 3D printed leg

Shared by Ana Duarte on 2016-12-13 14:49

About the solution

The athlete used a prosthesis made out of plaster, which took longer to produce and was more expensive. Using 3D priting, she hopes to have a gadget less expensive, more customized, and quicker to develop.

“My dream is to make better fitting performance prostheses accessible to all, so I am really excited about the results of this project. Ultimately, the number one most important thing about any prosthesis, and especially a sports prosthesis due to the amount of time spent training and competing in it, is comfort. Being able to develop a well-fitting prosthesis which doesn’t compromise on performance, in less time and for less money than traditional means, is a real break-through”, the Paralympian observed.

It takes about five days to produce the prosthesis, and it costs about a quarter of the price of any other alternative.

Denise and AutoDesk still want to make some modifications before making this solution available to anyone in the world. But they already presented their project to Barack Obama and Angela Merkel, at a technology fair in Germany, in 2016.

The athelete became the first Paralympian to use a 3D printed prosthesis.

Adapted from: http://bit.ly/2hJaxNp

More info: http://www.denise-schindler.de
https://youtu.be/Al8WQaYxgGI

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This solution shall not include mention to the use of drugs, chemicals or biologicals (including food); invasive devices; offensive, commercial or inherently dangerous content. This solution was not medically validated. Proceed with caution! If you have any doubts, please consult with a health professional.

About the author

Denise Schindler, born in Germany, in 1985, is a Paralympian cyclist who developed a 3D printed leg, with the help of AutoDesk, in 2016. She lost her leg in an accident when she was two years old.

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