• 1874
  • 0
  • 0
  • 3

3D printing to help deaf and hearing impaired people

Shared by Ana Duarte on 2015-12-15 21:52

About the solution

Honda was inspired by a deaf person he met at a cultural festival, who showed him around using gestures.

This device enables a deaf user to pick up on sounds such as alarms in a way they can register.

“I became very interested in deaf communication and I joined the research society. I studied sign language, volunteered as a sign language interpreter, and established a sign language circle at my university,’ he explains.

All of this inspired Honda to find a sound-based solution for everyday life for deaf people when he was looking for a graduate project in 2012. This eventually became the Ontenna. While looking like an ordinary hairpin, it is actually a mini-computer that conveys vibration through the user’s skin. Attached to your hair (though there is also an earring version), it is easy and comfortable to wear too. Sounds in the range from 30 dB to 90 dB are transformed into up to 256 different levels of vibration and light, enabling the wearer to associate certain patterns and noise levels with certain buzzing sensations.

This innovation was developed with the help of the MITOU Program, a bi-annual program aimed at promoting software engineering solutions and funded through the Governmental IT Promotional Agency. With this backing and 3D printing technology, Tatsuya Honda has already manufactured over 200 different prototypes that are being extensively testing.

Adapted from: http://bit.ly/2gcSSwW

More info: http://ontenna.jp/

What about you, do you have any solutions? Please share them with the Patient Innovation community!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=NfIaycdBdc4

This solution shall not include mention to the use of drugs, chemicals or biologicals (including food); invasive devices; offensive, commercial or inherently dangerous content. This solution was not medically validated. Proceed with caution! If you have any doubts, please consult with a health professional.

About the author

Tatsuya Honda, born in Japan, in 1988, developed Ontenna, a 3D printed hairclip that translates external sounds into vibration.

Tags associated to this solution

Comments (3)

  • PierceCarmelo Fri, 09/13/2019 - 20:07

    Amazing things can be done from 3D printing like this one. But there are no cheap printing services in the world of 3D printing. And if there are they are very few and not on a large scale.

  • PierceCarmelo Fri, 09/13/2019 - 20:15

    Amazing things can be done from 3D printing like this one. But there are no [url=https://www.cheap55printing.com/]cheap printing services[/url] in the world of 3D printing. And if there are they are very few and not on a large scale.

  • PierceCarmelo Fri, 09/13/2019 - 20:16

    Amazing things can be done from 3D printing like this one. But there are no cheap printing services in the world of 3D printing. And if there are they are very few and not on a large scale.
    https://www.cheap55printing.com/

Like solution
Close en
Close